Just as foretold: the meaning of the Lord’s Crucifixion was twisted

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On Good Friday, April 18th 2014, they held the Via Crucis in the Colosseum in Rome. The “meditations” on the way of the cross were all about the poor, the marginalized, the sick, the unemployed and the immigrants. This comes down to liberation theology (a form of catholic socialism), which was condemned by the Catholic Chuch.

Not once they mentioned explicitly that Jesus shed His Blood and died on the Cross to redeem us from our sins and to save us from eternal damnation in Hell.

We will show you a few excerpts of these “meditations”. You can read them all at the site of the Vatican, see link below.

SECOND STATION Jesus takes up his cross.

It is also the burden of all those wrongs which created the economic crisis and its grave social consequences: job insecurity, unemployment, dismissals, an economy that rules rather than serves, financial speculation, suicide among business owners, corruption and usury, the loss of local industry.

This is the cross which weighs upon the world of labour, the injustice shouldered by workers. Jesus shoulders it himself and teaches us to reject injustice and to learn, with his help, to build bridges of solidarity and of hope, lest we be like sheep who have lost our way amid this crisis.

THIRD STATION: Jesus falls for the first time.

With the inner strength which comes to him from the Father, Jesus also helps us to accept the failings of others; to show mercy to the fallen and concern for those who are wavering. And he gives us the strength not to shut the door to those who knock and ask us for asylum, dignity and a homeland. In the awareness of our own weakness, we will embrace the vulnerability of immigrants, and help them to find security and hope.

FIFTH STATION: Jesus is helped by Simon of Cyrene to carry his cross.

Only by opening my heart to divine love am I drawn to seek the happiness of others through the practice of charity: a night spent in hospital, an interest-free loan, a tear wiped away in the family, heartfelt generosity, farsighted commitment to the common good, a sharing of our bread and labour, the rejection of all jealousy and envy.

SEVENTH STATION: Jesus falls for the second time.

In him we glimpse the bitter experience of those locked in prisons of every sort, with all their inhumane contradictions. Confined and surrounded, “pushed hard” and “falling”. Prisons today continue to be set apart, overlooked, rejected by society. Marked by bureaucratic nightmares and justice delayed. Punishment is doubled by overcrowding: an aggravated penalty, an unjust affliction, one which consumes flesh and bone. Some – too many! – do not survive… And when one of our brothers and sisters is released, we still see them as “ex-convicts”, and we bar before them the doors of social and economic redemption.

NINTH STATION: Jesus falls for the third time.

May our contemplation of Jesus, who falls yet rises once more, help us to overcome the kinds of narrowness which fear of the future impresses on our hearts, especially at this time of crisis. Let us leave behind our unhealthy nostalgia for the past, our complacency and our refusal to change, and the attitude that says: “But we’ve always done it this way!”. [It seems like they are attacking the Traditional Catholics who don’t want to change] Jesus who stumbles and falls, but then rises, points us to a sure hope which, nourished by intense prayer, is born precisely at the moment of trial, not after or apart from it!

ELEVENTH STATION: Jesus is crucified.

Today many of our brothers and sisters, like Jesus, are nailed to a bed of pain, at hospital, in homes for the elderly, in our families. It is a time of hardship, with bitter days of solitude and even despair: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

TWELFTH STATION: Jesus dies on the cross.

“Remember me…” (Lk 23:42). The fraternal plea of the thief who became his companion in suffering, pierces Jesus’ heart; it is an echo of his own pain. And Jesus grants that request: “Today you will be with me in paradise” The pain of others always redeems us, since it draws us out of ourselves. [!!]

“Woman, here is your son! …” (Jn 19:26). But it is his mother, Mary, who stood with John at the foot of the cross, who dispels all fear. She fills that scene with tenderness and hope. Jesus no longer feels alone. So it is with us, if beside our bed of pain there is someone who loves us! Faithfully. To the end.

“I am thirsty” (Jn 19:28). Like the child who asks his mother for drink, like the patient burning with fever… Jesus’ thirst is the thirst of all those who yearn for life, freedom and justice. And it is the thirst of the one who is thirstiest of all: God, who, infinitely more than ourselves, thirsts for our salvation.

“It is finished” (Jn 19:30). Everything: every word, every action, every prophecy, every moment of Jesus’ life. The tapestry is complete. The thousand colours of love now shine forth in beauty. Nothing is wasted. Nothing thrown away. Everything has become love. Everything completed for me and for you! And so, even dying becomes meaningful!

http://www.vatican.va/news_services/liturgy/2014/documents/ns_lit_doc_20140418_via-crucis_en.html

The Lord foretold us on 8 April 2014:

“From Holy Week, this year, the cracks will appear and the meaning of My Crucifixion will be twisted. New interpretations will be presented before the faithful and lies will pour forth from the mouths of My enemies. My Passion will be mocked in subtle ways and will not be immediately apparent. But when the focus moves from My death on the Cross and when strange gestures take place in My Churches, you will know that this is the beginning of the dismantling of My Church on Earth.”

 

http://www.thewarningsecondcoming.com/you-will-know-these-traitors-by-their-symbolic-gestures-which-insult-my-divinity/

 

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